12
May
09

Dictatorial & Inflexible vs Determined & Resolute

resolute2

I just completed teaching a “No-Compromise Leadership Boot Camp” course. While discussing leadership blockages (those situations and accountabilities where procrastination and avoidance surface), the group got stuck on the fine line that separates a dictatorial and inflexible mode versus being determined and resolute. Simply put, if a leader says, “This is the way it needs to be done,” which mode is she leading in? Interestingly, it all depends on the thinking and behavior of individual leaders – and the situation in question.

If a leader is implementing a new system to dramatically fix and improve the customer service experience – and is holding team members accountable – is this being dictatorial or resolute? If it’s a system that everyone was trained on, agreed to and is good for the customer, the answer is resolute. If an employee is violating a standard of performance, quality procedure or something as basic as dress code, is holding the employee accountable being dictatorial or resolute? Again, the answer is resolute.

In contrast, if the leader says, “This is the way it needs to be done,” and gives no explanation to clarify his intentions – and refuses any collaboration – this is being dictatorial and inflexible. This is the infamous, “my way or the highway” tactic that does more to demoralize people and contaminate a culture.

Here are a few no-compromise strategies to help you function in the “determined and resolute” mode:

  • Is it good for the customer? If it’s good for the customer, it gets done. When a leader allows systems, procedures and quality issues to go unaddressed, compromise contaminates the culture. In this economy, a leader cannot allow any negative behavior to compromise the customer loyalty business outcome.
  • Clarify your intentions and expectations: Let employees know the entire story and how you and the entire team must be accountable. Most of all, explain how you will hold everyone accountable.
  • Work through your blockages: If you’re quick to label a situation that requires you to be determined and resolute as being dictatorial and inflexible, think “compromise” or “no compromise.” Is the situation or person compromising the integrity of the company? Then you must be determined and resolute, and engage as the leader. If you feel yourself hesitating or avoiding, think “compromise” or “no compromise.” No compromise must become your leadership mantra.

Leaders create unnecessary drag when they hesitate or avoid addressing issues and situations because they perceive it as being dictatorial and inflexible. The role of the no-compromise leader is to protect the integrity of the company culture – and do so with integrity and respect.

Pass this email on to your business colleagues, managers and friends.

Neil Ducoff, Strategies founder & CEO

I just completed teaching a “No-Compromise Leadership Boot Camp” course. While discussing leadership blockages (those situations and accountabilities where procrastination and avoidance surface), the group got stuck on the fine line that separates a dictatorial and inflexible mode versus being determined and resolute. Simply put, if a leader says, “This is the way it needs to be done,” which mode is she leading in? Interestingly, it all depends on the thinking and behavior of individual leaders – and the situation in question.

If a leader is implementing a new system to dramatically fix and improve the customer service experience – and is holding team members accountable – is this being dictatorial or resolute? If it’s a system that everyone was trained on, agreed to and is good for the customer, the answer is resolute. If an employee is violating a standard of performance, quality procedure or something as basic as dress code, is holding the employee accountable being dictatorial or resolute? Again, the answer is resolute.

In contrast, if the leader says, “This is the way it needs to be done,” and gives no explanation to clarify his intentions – and refuses any collaboration – this is being dictatorial and inflexible. This is the infamous, “my way or the highway” tactic that does more to demoralize people and contaminate a culture.

Here are a few no-compromise strategies to help you function in the “determined and resolute” mode:

* Is it good for the customer? If it’s good for the customer, it gets done. When a leader allows systems, procedures and quality issues to go unaddressed, compromise contaminates the culture. In this economy, a leader cannot allow any negative behavior to compromise the customer loyalty business outcome.
* Clarify your intentions and expectations: Let employees know the entire story and how you and the entire team must be accountable. Most of all, explain how you will hold everyone accountable.
* Work through your blockages: If you’re quick to label a situation that requires you to be determined and resolute as being dictatorial and inflexible, think “compromise” or “no compromise.” Is the situation or person compromising the integrity of the company? Then you must be determined and resolute, and engage as the leader. If you feel yourself hesitating or avoiding, think “compromise” or “no compromise.” No compromise must become your leadership mantra.

Leaders create unnecessary drag when they hesitate or avoid addressing issues and situations because they perceive it as being dictatorial and inflexible. The role of the no-compromise leader is to protect the integrity of the company culture – and do so with integrity and respect.

Pass this email on to your business colleagues, managers and friends.

Neil Ducoff, Strategies founder & CEO
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