16
Jun
08

You want to be the best – but will you do the work?

When you say that your company is “the best,” it means that it has little or no tolerance for anything that’s done below standard. Simply put, any activity or work that falls below standard that is not quickly addressed and resolved is compromise. And compromise of any sort has costs attached to it. True, even the best-of-the-best skip a beat every now and then, but their ability to consistently execute at superb levels in all business disciplines keeps them part of the elite few.
So, if your vision is to be the best, are you prepared to do whatever it takes to be the best? I ask this question because “the best” is the recipient of more lip service than it is of measurable action guided by no-compromise leadership. For example, while your touting how great your business is, are there customers not receiving the experience promised? Are there employees that regard rules as something for everyone else and not them? Are there employees that work harder at killing time than producing results? If any of these questions make you squirm, then a gap exists between your current reality and your vision of being the best. The next question is, what are you going to do about it?
Here are three red-hot strategies to be the best:
1. Lock in the right systems and procedures: Tiger Woods has one heck of a golf swing. He wasn’t born with it. He was coached. He practices relentlessly to perfect it. When it stops working, he goes though the complex and exasperating process of reinventing a better swing. Getting better is not an option – it’s the only option. Settling for status quo is a compromise.
2. Everyone learns, masters and plays: Double standards, playing favorites, or invoking the “grandfathered in clause” is pure compromise. It can wreck a business culture faster than you can say, “Accountability will get a lot of people upset.” It is the leader’s job to hold employees accountable to do the work they are hired to do. To be the best, everyone shows up and plays to win. Anything less is compromise.
3. Hold yourself accountable: If you reported to a no-compromise leader, would you be playing the business game with more intensity? Would you be getting more done and producing better results as a leader? Would you stop avoiding the tough conversations or decisions? If you were being held accountable by a higher up, chances are you’d be saying, “yes,” to these questions. So, hold yourself accountable. If you don’t, you compromise.
I believe there is growth and opportunity beyond your wildest dreams just waiting for you and your company. All that stands between achieving those wildest dreams are the three strategies I just presented to you. That’s all, just three disciplines to master and being the best will become a reality and bring with it all the just rewards that come with outstanding success.
Pass this email on to your business colleagues, managers and friends They’ll appreciate it.
Neil Ducoff, Strategies founder & CEO

dirty_glovesWhen you say that your company is “the best,” it means that it has little or no tolerance for anything that’s done below standard. Simply put, any activity or work that falls below standard that is not quickly addressed and resolved is compromise. And compromise of any sort has costs attached to it. True, even the best-of-the-best skip a beat every now and then, but their ability to consistently execute at superb levels in all business disciplines keeps them part of the elite few.

So, if your vision is to be the best, are you prepared to do whatever it takes to be the best? I ask this question because “the best” is the recipient of more lip service than it is of measurable action guided by no-compromise leadership. For example, while your touting how great your business is, are there customers not receiving the experience promised? Are there employees that regard rules as something for everyone else and not them? Are there employees that work harder at killing time than producing results? If any of these questions make you squirm, then a gap exists between your current reality and your vision of being the best. The next question is, what are you going to do about it?

Here are three red-hot strategies to be the best:

  1. Lock in the right systems and procedures: Tiger Woods has one heck of a golf swing. He wasn’t born with it. He was coached. He practices relentlessly to perfect it. When it stops working, he goes though the complex and exasperating process of reinventing a better swing. Getting better is not an option – it’s the only option. Settling for status quo is a compromise.
  2. Everyone learns, masters and plays: Double standards, playing favorites, or invoking the “grandfathered in clause” is pure compromise. It can wreck a business culture faster than you can say, “Accountability will get a lot of people upset.” It is the leader’s job to hold employees accountable to do the work they are hired to do. To be the best, everyone shows up and plays to win. Anything less is compromise.
  3. Hold yourself accountable: If you reported to a no-compromise leader, would you be playing the business game with more intensity? Would you be getting more done and producing better results as a leader? Would you stop avoiding the tough conversations or decisions? If you were being held accountable by a higher up, chances are you’d be saying, “yes,” to these questions. So, hold yourself accountable. If you don’t, you compromise.

I believe there is growth and opportunity beyond your wildest dreams just waiting for you and your company. All that stands between achieving those wildest dreams are the three strategies I just presented to you. That’s all, just three disciplines to master and being the best will become a reality and bring with it all the just rewards that come with outstanding success.

Pass this email on to your business colleagues, managers and friends They’ll appreciate it.

Neil Ducoff, Strategies founder & CEO and author of No-Compromise Leadership

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